PARC IMPERIAL

Address: 253 - 253C PASIR PANJANG ROAD
Type: Condo
Tenure: Freehold
District: 05
No. of Units: 138
Estimated TOP: 2010
Developer: FRAGRANCE PROPERTIES PTE LTD

Parc Imperial is a 138-unit freehold condominium located along Pasir Panjang Road. It is near to the PSA, Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre, International Science Park, West Coast Park, Kent Ridge Park and National University of Singapore (NUS).

Parc Imperial is situated near the Pasir Panjang Village, Haw Par Villa and a stone's throw from the West Coast MRT Station. Amenities like shops, restaurants, bistro, supermarkets can be found along Pasir Panjang Road and South Buona Vista Road.

Parc Imperial is accessible via West Coast Highway and Ayer Rajah Expressway(AYE) to all parts of Singapore. Commuting to the Central Business District (CBD) takes about 10 to 15 minutes.

PARC IMPERIAL LOCATION MAP


Click to view a larger map

FACILITIES AT PARC IMPERIAL

  • SWIMMING POOL
  • FUN POOL
  • JACUZZI
  • POOL DECK
  • FUNCTION ROOM
  • CHILDREN'S PLAYGROUND
  • GYMNASIUM
  • BBQ AREA
  • CAR PARK
  • 24-HOUR SECURITY

NEAREST MRT STATIONS

HAW PAR VILLA MRT STATION
Distance: 0.24 km

PASIR PANJANG MRT STATION
Distance: 1.23 km

KENT RIDGE MRT STATION
Distance: 1.29 km

NEAREST INTERNATINAL SCHOOLS

TANGLIN TRUST SCHOOL
Distance: 2.13 km

GLOBAL INDIAN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL (QUEENSTOWN)
Distance: 2.31 km

ISS HIGH SCHOOL
Distance: 2.45 km

NEAREST PRIMARY SCHOOLS

FAIRFIELD METHODIST SCHOOL (PRIMARY)
Distance: 2.19 km

NEW TOWN PRIMARY SCHOOL
Distance: 2.73 km

BLANGAH RISE PRIMARY SCHOOL
Distance: 2.83 km

MORE INFORMATION

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The above property picture gallery is for illustration purposes only



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Re: 27F wants to meet new people and make friends

lizzzzzy:
Hey Lois, ive already created a groupchat. I havent received your tapatalk pm though. Ive msgd you anyway. Go ping me your number :)

Re: 5th PR Application

dynoto:
@singaporeflyer : I am not eligible for EP :( yup this is my second application under my spouse.

@ecurelix: my husband salary did not increase for the past 2years due to bad business at his office. :(

@x9200: yep he is Indonesian Chinese, he got his PR only 2years ago.
Maybe ecurelix conclude that I am lady based on my profile name :)

My husband pay is no much diff from mine, especially after deducted 20% cpf :/
Is having baby will boost my chance?

just curious, did you study here?

given the info it seems that your first application is around a year plus after you start working

Re: Spouse for Citizenship

jamie9vardy:
For the benefit of fellow forumers, here's the official reply from ICA:

"Dear Sir/Madam,
We refer to your email below.
We sincerely apologise for the delayed response as we are experiencing a high volume of emails.
Kindly be informed that an adult applicant (21 years and above) who wishes to apply for Singapore Citizenship (SC) on his/her own merits (i.e. under Economic Scheme) has to be a Singapore Permanent Resident (SPR) for at least 2 to 6 years, gainfully employed and is continuously residing in Singapore prior to date of application.

Thank you.

Regards,
Citizen Services Centre ( Citizenship )
Immigration and Checkpoints Authority"

So this confirms on the eligibility that even a PR granted through "Applicant's Spouse" status is not deprived from applying SC on his/her own merits.

Yes, it's also published on ICA's FAQ (Question #1) that I've just come across.

http://www.ifaq.gov.sg/ICA/mobile/index.aspx#Docs/5188 - for future reference






Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Re: Shipping from Singapore to Melbourne

nanana:
FINALLY my boxes arrived!! It certainly took more than 5 weeks (as expected).
I moved to Canberra (yeah....of all the other states...). Was given a quote slightly more expensive than to other major cities in Aust (eg SYD/MELB)...but was promised a door-to-door service, and all costs included (exclude custom taxes), so I'm ok with it.

Anyway, Astromover came to take my boxes towards end of June. I received email sometime in July from their partner company in Aust, updating on the vessel and the expected arrival date of my boxes.
Then about 1-2 weeks later, received another email of an invoice for me to pay for the delivery from SYD - CBR. WTH?!!! I thought I already paid everything.

Had no choice but to make another call to SG office to settle with them. So they told me to email them the invoice, and they will bear the cost.
All is good, but I still had to fork out AUD$200++ for the custom clearance and "difficulty access" fees (apparently, i live in an apartment, the delivery man finds it "difficult" to deliver boxes through the lift!).

It took me another 2-3 more weeks after I made the payment for my boxes to arrive.

Overall, I wish the experience with Astromover could be better. I'm not sure if I would use their service again nor recommend them to anyone. I hope others will benefit from my experience.

Re: 5th PR Application

melongurlz:
@singaporeflyer : I am not eligible for EP :( yup this is my second application under my spouse.

@ecurelix: my husband salary did not increase for the past 2years due to bad business at his office. :(

@x9200: yep he is Indonesian Chinese, he got his PR only 2years ago.
Maybe ecurelix conclude that I am lady based on my profile name :)

My husband pay is no much diff from mine, especially after deducted 20% cpf :/
Is having baby will boost my chance?

Botox at Langkawi

SylviaS:
:D my Husband and I went to Langkawi a few weeks ago and a few things surprised us. We go to Langkawi twice a year and this was our first trip this year.

If you're not aware there's a regular flight from Singapore to Langkawi and it takes only an hour to get there. Clearing the airport is a whiz at Langkawi.

Anyways I was hoping to get back to Singapore and get my botox done at my regular place at Novena and was on the net looking around when I decided to search for aesthetic in Langkawi. I came across this clinic in Langkawi called Aishah clinic run by this specialist from Australia and was interested. My Husband took the boys to the beach when I thought I'll give this place a go. I calls up ahead but was told they were full for the day but they can slot me in as there was a cancellation.

I asked the taxi guy and he knew the place and off I went on my new adventure.

Arrived at this really nice clinic. I mean really nice. Very spacious and private as well with beautiful paintings on the wall and arranged to meet the doctor.

I had to wait a bit because there were other patients but it wasn't very Long. I would recommend that you call ahead if you want to head to this place.

Dr Aishah who runs the place is a pleasant doctor who has been in Langkawi for almost 5 years now. She runs the practise alone with 4 Nurses and is very qualified. She holds two specialist degrees in family medicine and aesthetics from Australia.

I was surprised that she was in a small town like Langkawi but she said her Husband works as a surgeon at the hospital and they moved here together.

Needless to say her skill and expertise are excellent. I had a brow lift and some fillers done. She only users original drugs and let's me see the labels if I want to and she charges very reasonably. I paid about RM 1600 for my entire treatment which was almost half of what I paid for it 2 years ago in Singapore.

It's 3 weeks now and the results are excellent. I'm seeing dr Aishah again next week.

I highly recommend this clinic. I found them on the web from their website. Gspotclinic.com. Funny name I know. But she said her Husband was looking for a catchy name for the clinic. He doesn't have a very good sense of humour I think.
Anyways. Flying to this beautiful place to have your face done is an excellent idea and this is a one of the best Centers I think that is around. Truly a hidden jewel.
The clinic is Aishah specialist clinic at pekan Rabu Langkawi or Aishah specialist clinic at pekan Rabu. I used their online forms for appointment and got a a20% discount so I highly recommend using this website.

Re: Spouse for Citizenship

room@home:
For the benefit of fellow forumers, here's the official reply from ICA:

"Dear Sir/Madam,
We refer to your email below.
We sincerely apologise for the delayed response as we are experiencing a high volume of emails.
Kindly be informed that an adult applicant (21 years and above) who wishes to apply for Singapore Citizenship (SC) on his/her own merits (i.e. under Economic Scheme) has to be a Singapore Permanent Resident (SPR) for at least 2 to 6 years, gainfully employed and is continuously residing in Singapore prior to date of application.

Thank you.

Regards,
Citizen Services Centre ( Citizenship )
Immigration and Checkpoints Authority"

So this confirms on the eligibility that even a PR granted through "Applicant's Spouse" status is not deprived from applying SC on his/her own merits.

Re: Whatsapp Meetup group

Casneuf:
Hi there, very interested!
26m from Belgium working in Sg. Pm me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

23M Looking for Ultra Goers

Kardin25:
Heyyy anyone going to Ultra? I'm planning to get the one day tic.

Re: 5th PR Application

x9200:
No evidence in the OP post (what is your literacy level, I mean reading comprehension Sir?), but google says you are probably right.

Re: RE: Re: 5th PR Application

ecureilx:

I thought OP is The wife ..

Re: 5th PR Application

x9200:
@OP, Is your wife also Indonesian Chinese?

Society of Petroleum Engineers - Singapore - AGM - Sept 8

PNGMK:
More info here
http://connect.spe.org/singapore/events ... 53b3daba49

Location: Blu Jazz Bali Lane (2nd Floor).

Culture Shock!

Pal:

Dubbed as ‘Asia Lite’ by some, modern Singapore makes an attractive tourist destination with its predominantly English-speaking populace providing a much gentler introduction to life in Asia than most of its regional counterparts. In particular, it holds great appeal for tourists travelling with their families and as well as for foreign professionals looking to emigrate. Nevertheless, to any traveller coming from outside of Asia, while local attractions may provide a feast for the eyes, it is the cultural norms in Singapore may provide some of their fondest, if not most startling, memories of their time in Singapore.

In this article, we’d introduce various aspects of local living that may seem quaint, draconian or quite simply baffling to the foreign visitor. We hope that this information would help to ease any sense of disorientation that one may experience when visiting Singapore for the first time, and that it’d help you to truly enjoy your time here.



Unlike Ireland, it doesn’t rain in Singapore for 364 days a year. However, when it rains, especially during the monsoon season, it pours. It pours down in such volume that you’d be forgiven for thinking that a man in the sky has upended a gigantic washbasin over the area. The Northeast monsoon season takes place from December to March, and the Southwest monsoon season takes place between June and September. That’s only about 243 days a year!

All joking aside, it generally shines more than it rains throughout the year, so you don’t have to worry that much about being caught in wet weather. As a bonus to being situated right above the equator, Singapore’s tropical climate is pretty hot and humid all the year round. It’s not uncommon to find people bearing their umbrellas aloft in the streets every day—they’re using them mainly to hide from the freakishly strong sunlight. Women are particularly conscientious about doing so in order to preserve their pale porcelain complexions. Umbrellas may also come in handy when you’re looking to snag a table at lunchtime and haven’t a spare pack of tissue paper tucked in your bag—we’d explain in the next point.



What do you do when lunch is only an hour long and the queues at your favourite hawker stall are already starting to snake into the adjacent stall’s territory? You’d like to order your food pronto but if you leave the table, that couple lurking over there is definitely going to grab it. What now?

This headache may occur only in Singapore, Malaysia or Hong Kong where hawker centres and food courts are prevalent. A hawker centre is essentially a covered space shared by hawkers who each lease their own stall, with a free-for-all area for diners who may choose to purchase their meal from any of the stalls. A food court works on the same principle, but with the addition of air-conditioning to the space.

When it gets crowded at lunch hour, it can be pretty tricky to snag a table for your friends and yourself while ensuring that your food somehow arrives simultaneously for everyone to eat together. In order to avoid the sad inevitability of making mournful eyes at your steaming curry rice while your friend is still queueing for his meal, take advantage of the Tissue Paper Law to ensure that everyone purchases their meals at the same time. In Singapore, it is an unofficial rule that any table with a packet of tissue placed on it is claimed territory. However, should the place be really packed, some may use tissue paper packs to chope (a Singlish term meaning ‘reserve’) just a single seat at a table—which could lead to some pretty bizarre sights such as four to five packets of tissue circling an empty table top.



Some of the friendlier visitors who attempt to ensnare an unwary Singaporean with small talk, may find themselves disappointed as their quarry gives them the side eye before fleeing. However, don’t take it personally. Many Singaporeans are polite and would do their best to assist you if you’re lost or need any help when navigating the day-to-day life. However, the concept of making small talk for no perceivable reason is one that makes them nervous and somewhat suspicious. A smile from a stranger would also cause them to be somewhat taken aback.

Though it takes a little more time for Singaporeans to warm up to strangers, it’s worth the wait if you’re staying in Singapore for a while. In fact, those who have moved to Singapore may face the opposite problem—once the locals have got used to seeing them around, they’d start making small talk with them all the time. In such situations, get used to having them remark on everything from your new haircut, to your clothes, to your nationality and job.


In following section below, we hope to bring to you more curious gems of Singaporean phenomena, beliefs and habits that could go a long way in making your trip or stay in Singapore a little less disorienting and a great deal more fun.



If there’s ever a right answer to the question, ‘Eat to live, or live to eat?’ you should probably know that the latter is always correct anytime and anywhere in Singapore. Aside from shopping, dining is probably the one activity that Singaporeans love best and they will not hesitate to travel immense distances for a favourite dish—or at least, as far as they can go, on an island that spans 50km across.

In fact, as a mark of how much we love our food, we don’t ask others how they’re doing when we make small talk—we ask if they have eaten. This may bewilder foreigners when the expected invitation does not arrive, so do remember to treat this question as a social nicety that does not necessarily extend to a lunch date. In general, we think that well-being is directly proportionate to the presence of food in our stomachs. If you’re dining with a Chinese friend or relative, it may be insulting to your host if you’re not eating enough. In short, you’re not leaving the table until you’re waddling or rolling your way out of the door.



Perhaps one of the most common impressions of Singaporeans is the country’s general orderliness. Whether you’re ordering food or trying to board the train, it’s almost guaranteed that there will be a queue and that people will be following it religiously. You could try to cut the queue, but it’s highly likely that you’d wind up being shamed by the person behind the counter and glared at by everyone else who’s standing in line.

If you need to impress a Singaporean relative, friend or colleague, nothing conveys your sincerity more clearly that food that you had to spend time queuing up for. If you’re in Singapore during Chinese New Year, you’d get bonus points for queuing up to purchase Bak Kwa, a sweet and savoury barbequed meat that jumps in price and popularity during this period. Expect to wait over two hours in the queue at the most popular stores.

This propensity to queue is actually a pretty good indicator of the most popular food stalls or the best deals in the area. Never ones to pass up freebies, Singaporeans frequently line up to redeem free gifts that are distributed as part of companies’ marketing efforts. It’s not uncommon for people to join queues without knowing what they’re queuing for, secure in the knowledge that everyone else must be on to a good thing.



Unlike the exorbitant fares charged by iconic London cabs and lavish Japanese cabs, Singapore cabs charge a very reasonable amount for the same distance travelled. For a normal cab ride, taxis charge an initial ‘flag down fee’ of S$3.20 to S$5.00 that’s inclusive of one kilometre’s worth of travel. Consequent travel rates range between 22 and 33 cents per 400 metres or part thereof travelled. Even if toll charges or midnight charges are levied, travelling from the eastern or western end of the island to the city centre is unlikely to cost more than S$30.

However, do note that depending on the car model, the flag down fee and travel rates differ—the larger and more luxurious the cab, the higher the cost. Nevertheless, taking the high cost of car ownership in Singapore into account, it could be more economical and convenient to travel regularly by cab. A potential downside to this would be the difficulty in finding a cab in rainy weather or shortly before midnight. Also, some taxi drivers rely on their passengers to guide them to their destination, especially if they don’t have access to GPS in their vehicle, so be prepared to hand out directions or to name the nearest landmark at least.

Travelling by cab is also a fantastic way to learn more about Singapore. In other countries, it may be common for people to chat with their regular hairstylist while sitting in relative silence in cabs, but this rule is inversed in Singapore where many hairstylists are taciturn while cab drivers are likely to quiz you about everything from your day’s plans, to your current occupation and nationality. They are generally well-informed about the best places to eat and the best places to go, and are hilariously opinionated about the local scene and a great fount of knowledge about all things Singaporean.

By Rayne

Re: RE: 5th PR Application

ecureilx:
Dear All,
I've been reading this forum for sometimes; it seems like i have slim chance (based on numerous rejections and no improvement on my occupation). However, I am not giving up hope yet!
I wish to hear the "Elders" opinions on my chances to get SPR...
My profile:-
27yo, Indonesian, Chinese, Married to Indonesian (SPR), No Kid (trying to conceive).
Work and stay in Singapore for approximately 5.5years. Spass Holder.
Occupation: Admin, Annual Income: $36k (never change my job since my first application, promoted once)
Current application (my fifth application) submitted in January 2016.


Don't give up hope.

I assume you applied under family ties scheme.

Highlighting any improvement in your husbands income etc may help.

Not much to say other than, well, Try to send more clean air to Singapore ;)